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    Dr. Farouk El-Baz

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    Dr. Farouk El-Baz

    مُساهمة  Mr. Mag في السبت نوفمبر 06, 2010 11:11 am

    Remote Sensing Today and Tomorrow: Applications in the Gulf Region
    by Dr. Farouk El-Baz, Director, Centre for Remote Sensing, Boston University, Boston, U.S.A.


    Dr. Farouk El-Baz
    Abstract :
    Much has been learned during the past 25 years since digital imaging from un-manned spacecraft was initiated in 1972. The Landsat, 80-meter resolution, Multi-Spectral Scanner (MSS) of the first three missions was replaced by the Thematic Mapper (TM), which flew on Landsat 4 and 5 with 30-meter resolution. SPOT ushered in panchromatic, stereo images at 10-meter resolution in addition to 30-meter multi-spectral images. Similarly, the Indian Resources Satellite (IRS-C) provided panchromatic images at 5.8-meter resolution. Furthermore, the Space Shuttle introduced in 1981 (SIR-A) radar imaging from Earth orbit. The SIR-A images revealed courses of ancient rivers in the Eastern Sahara that have long been buried by sand.
    The future of imaging the Earth from space holds greater promise. Three consortia of companies are developing sensors to be launched on unmanned, commercial satellites to acquire images with resolutions down to one meter. The ability to depict objects as small as one meter in three-dimensional images will make these data applicable to such activities as city planning and archaeological investigations. This is true particularly in desert regions, where the sparce vegetation does not mask the terrain. In the Gulf region in particular, satellite images are useful in the assessment of, and the exploration for, natural and cultural resources, and the monitoring of environmental changes over time.
    Dr. Farouk El-Baz - Profile :
    Dr. Farouk El-Baz is Research Professor and Director of the Center for Remote Sensing at Boston University. He received a B.Sc. degree (1958) in chemistry and geology from Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt; an M.S. degree (1961) in geology from the Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy, Rolla, Missouri; and a Ph.D. degree (1964) in geology from the University of Missouri, after performing research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (1962-1963). He taught geology at Assiut University, Egypt (1958-1960), and the University of Heidelberg, Germany (1964-1966). In 1989 he received an honorary Doctor of Science degree from the New England College, Henniker, New Hampshire.
    He participated in the Apollo program from 1967 to 1972 as Supervisor of Lunar Science Planning at Bellcomm, Inc. of Bell Telephone Laboratories, Washington, D.C. During these six years, he was Secretary of the Site Selection Committee for the Apollo lunar landings, Chairman of the Astronaut Training Group, and Principal Investigator for Visual Observations and Photography. Beginning in 1973, and for the next ten years, he established and directed the Center for Earth and Planetary Studies at the National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. In 1975 he was selected by NASA as Principal Investigator for Earth Observations and Photography on the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project, the first joint American-Soviet space mission. From 1982 to 1986 he was Vice President for International Development and for Science and Technology at Itek Optical Systems of Lexington, Massachusetts.
    Dr. El-Baz served on the Steering Committee of Earth Sciences of the Smithsonian Institution, the Arid and Semi-Arid Research Needs Panel of the National Science Foundation, the Advisory Committee on Extraterrestrial Features of the U.S. Board of Geographic Names, and the Lunar Nomenclature Group of the International Astronomical Union. In 1979, after the United States and China had normalized relations, he coordinated the first visit by U.S. scientists to the desert regions of northwestern China. In 1985 he was elected Fellow of the Third World Academy of Sciences and represents the Academy at the Non-Governmental Organizations Unit of the Economic and Social Council of the United Nations. He also served as Science Advisor (1978-1981) to the late Anwar Sadat, President of Egypt.
    He is known for pioneering work in the applications of space photography to the understanding of arid terrain, particularly the location of ground-water resources. Based on the analysis of space photographs, his recommendations resulted in the finding of ground-water resources in the Sinai Peninsula, the Western Desert of Egypt and in arid terrains in northern Somalia and the Red Sea Province of Eastern Sudan. Furthermore, during the past twenty years, he contributed to interdisciplinary field investigations in all major deserts of the world. At present, his research objectives include applications of remote sensing technology to the fields of archaeology, geography and geology.
    Dr. El-Baz is President of the Arab Society of Desert Research, and the recipient of numerous honors and awards including: NASA's Apollo Achievement Award, Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal, and Special Recognition Award; the University of Missouri Alumni Achievement Award for Extraordinary Scientific Accomplishments; the Certificate of Merit of the World Aerospace Education Organization; and the Arab Republic of Egypt Order of Merit- First Class. He also received the 1989 Outstanding Achievement Award of the Egyptian American Organization, the 1991 Golden Door Award of the International Institute of Boston, and the 1992 Award for Public Understanding of Science and Technology of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In 1995, he received the Award for Outstanding Contributions to Science and Space Technology of the American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee, and the Achievement Award of the Egyptian American Professional Society. He also received the 1996 Michel T. Halbouty Human Needs Award of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists.


    Prof. Farouk El-Baz
    Dr Farouk El-Baz is Research Professor and Director of the Center for Remote Sensing at Boston University. He received a BSc degree (1958) in chemistry and geology from Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt; an MS degree (1961); and a PhD degree (1964) both in geology and both from the University of Missouri-Rolla. He taught geology at Assiut University, Egypt (1958-1960), and at the University of Heidelberg, Germany (1964-1966). In 1989, he received an honorary Doctor of Science degree from the New England College, Henniker, New Hampshire, USA.
    He participated in the Apollo program from 1967 to 1972 as Supervisor of Lunar Science and of Lunar Exploration at Bellcomm Inc., Bell Laboratories, Washington DC. During these six years, he was secretary of the site selection committee for NASA's Apollo lunar landings, chairman of the astronaut training group, and principal investigator for visual observations and photography. 1973-1983, he established and directed the Center for Earth and Planetary Studies at the National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC. 1982-1986, he was Vice-President for International Development and for Science and Technology at Itek Optical Systems of Lexington, Massachusetts.
    Dr El-Baz served on the Steering Committee of Earth Sciences of the Smithsonian Institution and the Arid and Semi-Arid Research Needs Panel of the National Science Foundation. He also served as Science Advisor to the late Anwar Sadat, President of Egypt (1978-1981).
    He is known for his pioneering work in the applications of space photography to the understanding of arid terrain, particularly the location of groundwater resources and has contributed to interdisciplinary field investigations in all major deserts of the world.
    Dr El-Baz is President of the Arab Society of Desert Research. He has received many honors and awards including: NASA's Apollo Achievement Award, Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal and Special Recognition Award; the Certificate of Merit of the World Aerospace Education Organization; and the Arab Republic of Egypt Order of Merit - First Class. He also received the 1989 Outstanding Achievement Award of the Egyptian American Organization, and the 1992 Award for Public Understanding of Science and Technology of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He also received the 1996 Michael T Halbouty Human Needs Award of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists.
    Dr Farouk El-Baz was elected a Fellow of the IAS in 1998.

      الوقت/التاريخ الآن هو الإثنين ديسمبر 05, 2016 4:22 am